The success of these cars was largely due to their exceptional power to weight ratios, being light for their size, however with the necessary modern day evils of passive safety items like airbags, structural reinforcements etc., pushing both the weight and prices up, those days were quickly numbered.

Article Specifications

Print

Word Count
924
Photos
17
Suggested Page Count
4-6

Web

Word Count
348
Photos
17
Videos
1

Social

Photos
17

BMW M2


The glory years of BMW’s sports cars were almost always in its smallest coupes like the ’02 and M3, so when the M2 was announced, the excitement was palpable. Thankfully it was also justified.


There’s a basic equation to building exciting sports cars which includes not much weight combined with a lot of power and thankfully the BMW M2 follows it to a tee.


Ever since I heard of the BMW M2’s imminent arrival I was keen to get my hands on it. Having owned a modified 2002 and dreamed of the original E30 M3 which I eventually got to drive, the M2 on paper looked like the natural successor to both.


A chuckable little car with a wheel on each corner, more power than its rear-driven wheels can handle but with a chassis that’s still up to the job of keeping things in control. You could not write the script any better than this.


Its three-litre, turbocharged, six-cylinder engine is borrowed from the M235i but has been tweaked with pistons and camshafts taken from the M3 to give it 370bhp and 465Nm of torque. It runs through a seven-speed, dual clutch transmission and gives it a 0-100kmh time of 4.3 seconds. [To be continued...]

Videos