This flagship model is a limited run that’s been tickled under the hood to deliver more power, bringing its twin-turbocharged, 3.8-litre V6 up to an even 600bhp with 652Nm of torque

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Nissan GT-R


It’s nearly 10 years old yet has barely changed since it stormed onto the scene as the challenger to the European supercar throne. The Nissan GT-R has undergone a mild facelift for 2018 which means of course, more horsepower.


For nearly 50 years, the Japanese GT-R has been the disruptor to the traditional European supercar brigade and even as this current shape nears the end of its life, there’s a sting in its tail that’ll keep it annoying the establishment for a few more years yet.


Nissan has tweaked the venerable GT-R for 2018 by putting a few more ponies under the hood and divided it up into four new sub-categories.


Making GT-R ownership more achievable is the baseline Pure model which is basically the previous version with the Bose 11-speaker sound system and titanium exhaust removed which is enough for it to sneak under the $100k barrier at $US99,990.


It still gets 20-inch wheels, LED lights, parking sensors, adaptive suspension, configurable drive modes and keyless entry, so it’s barely a price-driven stripper.


Inside it’s equally well-equipped with leather, dual-zone climate, a heated eight-way powered driver’s seat, rearview camera, voice controls, an 8-inch display which shows performance data on a Gran Turismo-style screen, CarPlay, Bluetooth and a six-speaker Bose unit. [To be continued...]


 

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