Impressively, automatic emergency braking is standard on every Tiguan and it can slow or even stop the car if it senses that a collision is imminent at low speeds which is not something you will find on many of its competitors for the same money

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Volkswagen Tiguan


Volkswagen’s new Tiguan is more than just a long-awaited refresh of its very popular entry-level SUV, it’s a repositioning of it from being a sturdy volume chaser to an upmarket niche contender.


One of the advantages of keeping a model in circulation for so long is that when it’s eventually replaced, manufacturers have the chance to re-position it so it can grab a larger slice of the market pie.


The Volkswagen Tiguan which, despite selling more than 2.8 million units worldwide, has been in desperate need of an upgrade as it’s remained basically unchanged since 2007.


Whereas the old Tiguan was closer to the cheap-‘n-cheerful end of town, taking on the likes of the Nissan Qashqai, Toyota Rav4 and the Koreans, this new model has packed up and moved into the posh neighbourhood where the BMW X1, Mercedes-Benz GLC and close cousin, the Audi Q5 all live.


The top range R-Line model now features a two-litre, turbocharged engine delivering 220bhp and 350Nm of torque running through VW’s 4Motion all-wheel drive system. This will still get you to the beach or campsite but just don’t venture too far off-road as it remains a predominately on-road vehicle that can, if needed, go off-road.


On road, it rides as good as any mid-sized passenger car with little body roll thanks to reasonably stiff suspension which is partly due to the R-Line’s 20-inch alloy wheels but is somehow still compliant enough over speed humps. [To be continued...]

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